History

With a rich history dating back well over 100 years, FCC has long been the club of choice for local business and community leaders, as well as families seeking the private club lifestyle.
 
1898 – Fargo Golf Club opens; becomes first golf club in the state of North Dakota.
 
1916 – Operating as Fargo Country Club, the club is granted non-profit status by the club and purchases an additional 80 acres at the edge of town and constructs a second nine-hole golf course.
 
1923 – Following an additional land purchase, the club builds and opens the first 18-hole golf course in the state of North Dakota.
 
1934 – The club builds it’s first true clubhouse for a then-staggering cost of $35,000.
 
1935 – Using proceeds from slot machines operated on club property, FCC builds the golf course’s first irrigation system. These slot machines remained in operation at the club and provided valuable income until shortly after WWII when a state-wide crackdown on gambling forced their removal.
 
1950 – The clubhouse undergoes the first significant renovation. Subsequent renovations would take place in 1965, 1981, 1995 and 2010.
 
1961 – FCC decides to build another nine holes along the Red River south of the clubhouse. The new nine opens to members in 1963. The original “upper nine” holes are sold for residential and commercial usage.
 
1995 – FCC hosts the US Junior Amateur Championship, becoming the first club in North Dakota to host a national USGA event.
 
2001 – The club hosts its’ second USGA event, the Women’s Trans National Amateur Golf Championship.
 
2010 – Club completes a full-scale clubhouse renovation that includes new dining facilities, locker room, sports bar and other amenities.
 
Fargo has also had the honor of hosting many of the world’s top golfers and celebrities over the years. Among those known to have played FCC include Gene Sarazen, who played just after returning stateside following his win at the 1932 British Open, Sam Snead, the PGA Tour’s all-time wins leader, Lloyd Mangrum, 1946 US Open champ and entertainer Bob Hope. FCC is also the home to Paul Runyan. Known as the “Little Giant Killer”, Runyan won 29 tour events including the 1934 and 1938 PGA Championships. Prior to his successful career on tour, Runyan was the club’s caddie master in the early 1920’s.